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ORIGINS 

"Res Publica" is the root of the word, "republic", a form of governance attributed to initial implementation by the Romans in the 6th century BCE but based on earlier, significant Greek democracy concepts and upon which the great American political experiment of 1776 was based.

By description, it is a form of government in which that government is officially apportioned to the control of the people and thus a "public matter" (Latin: res publica) and where offices of state are subsequently directly or indirectly elected or appointed.

OK, so that defines a "republic". Now, what about a " democracy"? In school, didn't we learn that our form of government is a democracy? So, what's the difference between a republic and a democracy – especially one based on majority rule?

Before proceeding further, be aware that even Thomas Jefferson, as the founding father champion of the republican form of government, capitulated to the popular weight of majority rule democracy into which our nation now has further morphed and degenerated.

So, once again, what is the difference between a republic and a majority rule democracy? In the Pledge of Allegiance we all pledge allegiance to our Republic, not to a democracy. "Republic" is the proper intended description of our government, not "democracy".

Now here is a most interesting fact: The word "democracy" does not appear anywhere in the Declaration of Independence nor anywhere in the Constitution nor again anywhere in any of the constitutions of the fifty states. But is the concept of understanding or even restoring a republic today even possible? And why should we attempt it or even care – or not?


[REPUBLIC vs. DEMOCRACY]
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