image

PATHWAYS 

Emerging from the earliest of times when language records of human activity were virtually nonexistent, early civilizations began to develop around the knowledge of crop cultivation and animal domestication which led to permanent-like settlements rather than the hunter/killer nomadic existence of the past. With food and shelter now more secured, the knowledge of the world around early man began to grow.

With one eye on the sky and the other on the earth bound environment in which they lived, our early ancestors began the process of trying to determine the why's and what for's of their very existence and the nature of their world perspective. They recognized that causes led to effects but underestimated the degree of difficulty in finding rational explanations to explain what they perceived.

Thus, into this world came the Tribal Chief and his right hand man, the Tribal Witchdoctor who provided most of the cause and effect explanations which were centered primarily around imagining which god or goddess was responsible for which natural phenomenon. Without the precision of the empirical tools of science that were to emerge at a much later date, the cause and effect analysis of the Witchdoctor was driven by his imagination through speculation, pondering, conjecture and even meditation which  produced resulting fallacies that emerged to seem quite logical at the time.

This, then, became the age of mysticism and the foundation of religion through the beliefs in gods and goddesses that ruled the heavens and the earth to produce all observed natural phenomena. Even the great Greek thinkers of their day fell victim to these cause and effect processes that, although resulting in fallacious results, were looked upon  for millennia as the definitive explanation for pre-scientific observation such as the motions of heavenly bodies and earth bound phenomena.

As the early civilizations waxed and waned, their cumulative contributions to the ever-growing body of human knowledge was preserved by word of mouth, stone, scrolls, parchment, and the patience of scribes and scholars recording all by hand alone. The social sciences dominated knowledge and progressed through the addition of philosophy, economics education, geography, history, law, politics psychology, sociology, and the early attempts to describe natural phenomena that ultimately would become the various fields of the physical sciences.

In our European continental domain of intellectual expansion (made possible by the preservation and dissemination of the vast extent of Egyptian, Greek and Roman knowledge by the Saracen Empire stretching across North Africa into both the lands of the Mid and Far East), from the 6th century forward, the fifteenth century heralded in the Enlightenment, commonly referred to as the Renaissance. The ability to break free of the tedium of hand recorded information through the introduction of one of the most important inventions known to man,  opened the floodgates of communicating knowledge and the dissemination of that knowledge throughout not only all of the European empires but also the entire world at large.

In following our analogy of identifying and pursuing knowledge as predominately two pathways that ultimately will lead to One World Of and By the People, we now can investigate further the significance of the evolution of the physical sciences and then turn our attention to the social sciences.

[PHYSICAL SCIENCE]                                   Go to Top                                      Print Page

image



image

image